Much ado about nothing the power

Although commended for his bravery in battle, Claudio is presented as young and naive.

Don pedro much ado about nothing character analysis

The Brothers Don Pedro: As the Prince of Aragon, Don Pedro is the most powerful character in the play, and he is happy to use his power to manipulate events — but only for the good of his soldiers and friends. In the first scene, he falls hopelessly in love with Hero without even speaking to her! The text does not give us a conclusive explanation for his melancholy, nor for his fascination with dissembling. Dogberry: a bumbling constable. Balthasar: An attendant on Don Pedro. He is a difficult character to sympathize with because he is led purely by his courtly sense of honor. Continue Reading. Throughout the play, he swings from love to despair to revenge too easily. Never in any of this does Hero have a say. Both are painfully witty and have no desire to marry, and both are shown to still harbour a flame for the other. Beatrice: In many ways, she is very similar to her lover, Benedick; she is locked into the same love-hate relationship, is quick-witted and never wants to marry. Hero: As the beautiful daughter of Leonato, she soon attracts the attention of Claudio, who instantly falls in love with her. Lee Jamieson has a M. Once she is tricked into thinking that Benedick is in love with her, she soon reveals her sweet, sensitive side.

Though Benedick is seen to love Beatrice, he does nothing about it until he gains knowledge that she is also in love with him, and meanwhile Beatrice performs the same feat. We see the two of them interacting with one another in a war of wits, bouncing off one another on an even field.

Interestingly, Don Pedro makes half-advances on both Hero and Beatrice in the play — perhaps this explains his sadness in the final scene when he is the only nobleman without a wife. Despite his cloudy motives, Don Pedro does work to bring about happiness.

Much ado about nothing the power

He is a difficult character to sympathize with because he is led purely by his courtly sense of honor. He is the noblest character in the social hierarchy of the play, and his friends Benedick and Claudio, though equals in wit, must always defer to him because their positions depend upon his favor. Perhaps his exchange with Beatrice at the masked ball—in which he proposes marriage to her and she jokingly refuses him, taking his proposal as mere sport—pains him; perhaps he is truly in love with Beatrice. Throughout the play, he swings from love to despair to revenge too easily. Don Pedro has power, and he is well aware of it; whether or not he abuses this power is open to question. Though Benedick is seen to love Beatrice, he does nothing about it until he gains knowledge that she is also in love with him, and meanwhile Beatrice performs the same feat. The two are described almost exactly the same, and prove to be equals in everything but sex and the societal ranking of said sex for the times. She is the innocent victim in the play when she is slandered by Don John as part of his plan to crush Claudio. There is almost no dialogue between the two of them until the wedding scene, but Claudio finds himself madly in love with Hero near immediately. The Sexton: Leads the trial against Borachio and Conrad. In Much Ado About Nothing, however, we are privy to two relationships that are each the embodiment of either view on women.

There is almost no dialogue between the two of them until the wedding scene, but Claudio finds himself madly in love with Hero near immediately. Continue Reading.

much ado about nothing characters

Don Pedro has power, and he is well aware of it; whether or not he abuses this power is open to question. He is a difficult character to sympathize with because he is led purely by his courtly sense of honor.

Throughout the play, he swings from love to despair to revenge too easily.

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SparkNotes: Much Ado About Nothing: Don Pedro, Prince of Aragon